menu close

Send Money to the UK

Send Money to the UK

Use the peer-to-peer exchange here at CurrencyFair to send money to the UK and you can see your transfer fees cut by up to 90 per cent, and even beat the inter-bank rate. It’s easy to transfer money to the UK with us, and we can save you both time and money when you exchange with us.

Get started

How CurrencyFair can Help You Send Money to the UK

It’s easy to transfer money to the UK, and you can make your first transfer today. Once your account is set up and you’ve deposited your funds, you can choose from our two exchange options.

deposit-exchange-transfer

Opt for “Create an Auto-Transaction” and an exchange will take place as soon as your money hits your CurrencyFair account, at the best available rate. Alternatively, specify the rate you would like to achieve in our Exchange and wait until your chosen rate is reached.

Compare our prices to your bank’s – we’ll always save you money. Check out our live sterling to euro rates, sign up today and put some cash back in your own pocket.

How much can CurrencyFair save you on your international money transfers?

logo-currencyfair-pos Typical Bank
Transfer amount
£ 2,000.00
Transfer amount
£ 2,000.00
International transfer fees
£ 2.50
International transfer fees
£ 40.00
Exchange rate margin
£ 6.00
Exchange rate margin
£ 60.00
Total cost of transaction
£ 8.50
Total cost of transaction
£ 100.00
On average you pay just 0.35% of the amount exchanged plus a €3 (or currency equivalent) transfer fee.

Sign up today and start saving money

A History of UK Currency

The pound sterling (also known as the British pound) is the currency of the United Kingdom. It’s also the currency of Jersey, Guernsey, the Isle of Man, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, the British Antarctic Territory and Tristan da Cunha.

The pound sterling is the oldest currency in the world that’s still in use, and it is sub-divided into pence. One pound is 100 pence.

Sterling is the fourth most-traded currency on the foreign exchange market and, together with the US dollar, the euro and the Japanese yen, it makes up the ‘basket of currencies’ that calculate the value of IMF special drawing rights.

Although the United Kingdom has previously been a member of the European Union, it recently voted to leave the political union, and the country never adopted the euro.